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Notary Services
 


We provide services similar to those of a notary public in the United States.  We provide notary services for: (1) U.S. citizens or (2) non-U.S. citizens who need notarized documents for use in the United States. 

You are responsible for any legal document that you execute.  Therefore, you should review, understand, and accept the contents before you sign it.  If you need assistance, we recommend that you consult an attorney.  Please see our Professional Services page for referrals.  We are not attorneys, and U.S. government regulations do not allow us to provide legal advice (including preparing or explaining legal documents). 

We perform notary services by appointment only.  Please visit our ACS Appointment page to make an appointment for “Notary and Other Services.” Expect to spend about 30 minutes at the Consulate while we notarize your document.  Once the document is notarized, it may not be altered.

TO HAVE A DOCUMENT NOTARIZED AT THE CONSULATE, YOU WILL NEED:

1. The complete document to be notarized

  • Some frequently-used forms are available below.
  • Ensure that you have all pages of the document.
  • For a lengthy or complex document (such as a will, loan, or real estate transfer), please get clear instructions from the attorney, bank, or company that prepared it about where to initial, where to sign, and where we should place our notary seal.  It is better to get this right the first time to avoid having to execute the same document a second time, including paying additional notary fees.
  • For all documents, please complete any fill-in blanks, such as those for dates, places, and names, and initials.  If you need assistance, you should consult an attorney before coming to the Consulate.
  • Please do not sign the document.

2. Your passport or other government-issued ID

  • We must confirm your identity to provide a notary service.
  • Personal appearance is required for notary services.

3.  Witness(es), if required by the document

  • U.S. regulation does not permit Consulate staff to serve as witnesses. 
  • Each witness must bring his own government-issued ID. 
  • If you are not sure whether your document must be witnessed, check with the attorney, bank, or company that provided it.

4.  Fee: $50.00 per notary seal.  You may pay in U.S. dollars or the equivalent in Thai baht.  Also, we accept most major credit cards.

We may refuse to provide a notary service when:

  • the person executing the document does not understand the nature, language or consequences of the document
  • the host country does not authorize the performance of the service
  • the document will be used in transactions or for purposes that may be prohibited by U.S. law
  • we believe that the document will be used for a purpose that is unlawful, improper, or inimical to the best interests of the United States
  • we cannot understand the document, due to language or any other reason.  

 

COMMON NOTARY ISSUES AND FREQUENTLY-USED FORMS
The forms below are provided only for convenience.  You are responsible for the contents of any legal document that you execute.

Affidavit of Eligibility to Marry.  Please see our Getting Married in Thailand page.   
 
Affidavit of Income ("Income Verification").  To extend your stay in Thailand, Thai immigration might ask you to get a letter from us to “verify” your income.  In fact, we are not empowered to do this.  Instead, you may execute an affidavit in which you swear under oath or affirm your monthly income.  Use the
Affidavit of Income (PDF, 36 KB).  Fill in all of the blanks, but do not sign it. 

Affidavit for Vehicle Issues ("Residence Verification").  To get a driver’s license, buy a vehicle, sell a vehicle, or register a vehicle, the Thai Department of Land Transportation might ask you get a document from us to “verify” your residence in Thailand.  In fact, we are not empowered to do this.  Instead, you may execute an affidavit in which you swear under oath or affirm your monthly local address.  Use the Affidavit for Vehicle Issues (PDF, 35.0 KB).  Fill in all of the blanks above the signature line, but do not sign it.

Apostille.  U.S. Consular officers are not empowered to affix an apostille to public documents.  For more information about the apostille, please see the Department of State website on Notarial and Authentication Services

Authentication/Certification of U.S. vital records (birth certificates, marriage certificates, etc.).  Thai government authorities might ask you to have the Embassy or Consulate “certify” a U.S. birth, marriage, or death certificate.  In fact, we are not empowered to authenticate, certify, or legalize U.S. state public documents.  Only the U.S. Department of State Office of Authentications can do so. 

As an alternative, Thai authorities might accept an affidavit in which you swear or affirm to the facts of the event recorded in the birth, marriage, or death certificate.  (For example: "I married [spouse name] at [city and state] on [date].")  Use the blank affidavit (PDF, 35 KB).  Complete items 1-3 but do not sign it.  Please do not refer to the birth, marriage, or death certificate itself in the affidavit, and do not attach a copy of the certificate to the affidavit.          

Authentication/Certification of U.S. academic records.  We are not empowered to authenticate diplomas, transcripts, or other academic credentials from U.S. academic institutions or provide notary services related to such credentials.  Please see the Department of State webpage on Authentication of American Academic Credentials for Use Abroad

Background Check/Criminal Records Check.  We cannot provide a background check or criminal record check because we are not a law enforcement agency. Please see the Department of State webpage on Criminal Records Checks.

To be fingerprinted for a criminal records check, see if a Thai police station can do it for you.  If not, contact Royal Thai Police Headquarters, Building 24, Phra Ram 1, Pathumwan District, Bangkok 10330.  Tel.: 022-051-339, 022-052-556, or 022-052-169.  We do not offer fingerprinting services at the Consulate.  You may download a standard FBI fingerprint form from the FBI's Fingerprints and Other Biometrics website.   

Blank Affidavit.  An affidavit is a written declaration confirmed by oath or affirmation or containing a declaration under penalty of perjury.  If you need one, use our blank affidavit (PDF, 35 KB).  Complete items 1-3 but do not sign it.  Because laws vary from place to place, we cannot advise you on the specific language or content of your affidavit.  To ensure that it will be valid, you should consult an attorney.  Please see our Professional Services page.   

Certificate of Good Conduct.  We cannot provide a “Certificate of Good Conduct” because such a document does not exist in the United States.  Please see “Background Check,” above. 

Certified Translation.  We do not offer translation services to the public.  Instead, please see our Professional Services page for a list of translation services.

Certified True Copy.  We can make certified true copies of U.S. passports or of foreign records required by U.S. government agencies, including certified true copies needed for an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) application (IRS Form W-7).  Please see our U.S. taxes page for further information about ITINs.   

We are not otherwise empowered to make certified copies of U.S. vital records (such as birth, marriage, and death certificates), court documents, or academic records.  To get a certified copy, contact the office that issued the document.  For a birth, marriage, or death record, contact the state or territory office of vital records.  For a list of these, see the Centers for Disease Control's webpage on Where to Write for Vital Records.

Medallion Signature Guarantee.  U.S. financial institutions sometimes require a Medallion Signature Guarantee.  This is not a notary service, but rather a special procedure that can be performed only by financial institutions that have a Medallion program approved by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).  At present, no financial institutions in Thailand are authorized to provide the Medallion Signature Guarantee service.  Likewise, U.S. consular officers are not authorized to provide it.  If you are dealing with a U.S. financial institution that requires a Medallion Signature Guarantee, explain that it is unavailable in Thailand and ask whether a notarial Acknowledgement at the Consulate would be an acceptable alternative.

Power of Attorney.  A power of attorney allows you to designate someone to take legal actions on your behalf and in your name.  For example, you may grant power of attorney to someone in the U.S. to allow him to buy or sell property in your name. 

Your lawyer, bank, or real estate company might provide you with a power of attorney in the correct form.  If so, you should use it.  If not, you may use our blank power of attorney (PDF, 5.61 KB) form.  Please complete the top half of the form before coming to the Consulate, but do not sign it.  Because laws vary from place to place, we cannot advise you on the specific language or content of your power of attorney.  To ensure that it will be valid, you should consult an attorney.  Please see our Professional Services page.   

Please note the following restrictions on Powers of Attorney:

  • In general, each power of attorney document can list only one grantor.  That is, if more than one person is granting power of attorney, each grantor should execute his own power of attorney document.
  • In general, a power of attorney cannot outlive the grantor.  That is, if you wish to designate an executor or legal representative to handle your affairs after you die, you must draft a will.  A power of attorney will not suffice.  To draft a will, you should consult a local attorney.  Please see our Professional Services page.